São Paulo’s mayor claimed powder made from food close to its sell-by date was a cost-free way to tackle hunger but critics denounced it as ‘human pet food’

Prosecutors in Brazil’s biggest city have opened an inquiry into a controversial plan to feed poorer citizens and schoolchildren with a flour made out of food close to its sell-by date that critics have described as “human pet food”.

João Doria, the populist, conservative mayor of São Paulo, and the city’s Catholic cardinal, Dom Odilo Scherer, have said that the product, called farinata (farinha is flour in Portuguese), will help alleviate hunger at no cost to the city’s government.

Continue reading…

Facebook Comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.